St. Jude Progress

Silhouette of woman

Melanoma clinic goes virtual for pandemic

Posted by Alberto Pappo, MD | May 3, 2021

Creating the St. Jude Melanoma Clinic not only provides enhanced multidisciplinary evaluation and care, but also opportunities for families to share their experience, attend educational sessions and enroll on a registry and tissue bank for research.

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COVID-19 vaccine working group

Advocating globally for a COVID-19 vaccine

Posted by Miguela Caniza, MD, MPH | Apr 30, 2021

It’s essential to provide an accurate, science-based website for vaccine information. The St. Jude Global COVID-19 Working Group plans to provide accurate COVID-19 information, including answering questions and providing vaccine news as it emerges.

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COVID-19 virus model, with spike proteins

Five things to know about COVID vaccines

Posted by Paul Thomas, PhD | Apr 5, 2021

No matter what kind of COVID vaccine someone receives, your immune system is primed to fight the virus. Here are 5 things you need to know.

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Cancer care during a pandemic: What we learned prepares us for the next emergency

Cancer care during a pandemic: What we learned prepares us for the next emergency

Posted by Dylan Graetz, MD, MPH | Apr 2, 2021

The pandemic exposed shortcomings in health care. But this study revealed more than expected in this type of children’s treatment.

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FLU

A 3D print of influenza virus shows the yellow surface covered with proteins called hemagglutinin (colored blue) and neuraminidase (colored red) that enable the virus to enter and infect human cells. Image provided by the National Institutes of Health.

Immune markers offer clues to antibody production in response to flu

Posted by Mary Powers | Apr 7, 2021

Scientists are learning more about antibody production in response to flu, including how they develop from helper T cells and monocytes.

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Changing the trajectory of flu for the sickest patients

Changing the trajectory of flu for the sickest patients

Posted by David Boyd, PhD | Nov 4, 2020

Research reveals that supportive tissue in the lungs helps coordinate the immune response to flu by regulating access to the tissue and inflammation in the lungs.

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Can common nasal bacteria be targeted to slow flu transmission? Maybe.

Can common nasal bacteria be targeted to slow flu transmission? Maybe.

Posted by Mary Powers | Oct 19, 2020

This new study shows that flu transmission and infection could be slowed or prevented by this simple technique.

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The truth about pandemics: 5 questions about COVID-19 and flu

The truth about pandemics: 5 questions about COVID-19 and flu

Posted by Elizabeth Jane Walker | Sep 30, 2020

Where does coronavirus come from? What should we expect this flu season? Infectious disease experts talk about COVID-19 and flu.

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Leaf with water droplets

For the growing number of childhood cancer survivors, five-year survival is just the beginning

Posted by AnnaLynn Williams, PhD | May 11, 2021

As cancer survivorship changes, new benchmarks must be set to redefine survivorship research and treatment success.

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A 3D print of influenza virus shows the yellow surface covered with proteins called hemagglutinin (colored blue) and neuraminidase (colored red) that enable the virus to enter and infect human cells. Image provided by the National Institutes of Health.

Immune markers offer clues to antibody production in response to flu

Posted by Mary Powers | Apr 7, 2021

Scientists are learning more about antibody production in response to flu, including how they develop from helper T cells and monocytes.

Learn more
Different types of pediatric cancer treatments are ototoxic, or damaging to the ears. As cancer treatments become more effective and survival rates increase, we’re getting a better picture of how various treatments affect patients later on.

What we’ve found out about hearing loss and cognitive function in children

Posted by Johnnie Bass, AuD, PhD | Mar 25, 2021

This study, to our knowledge, is the first to objectively measure hearing and neurocognitive function in a large cohort of long-term survivors of childhood cancer stratified by treatment exposures.

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How do fathers grieve the loss of a child?

How do fathers grieve the loss of a child?

Posted by Michael J. McNeil, MD | Mar 10, 2021

Fathers express grief through keeping busy or focusing on work – different than a mother’s grief. But fathers may not be getting the support they need after the loss of a child.

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Illustration depicting all the different things that occur during rehabilitation through an arch with symbols representing different rehabilitation ideas. A path goes between many things going on, such as jumping rope, reading and children playing.

Identifying risks and restrictions: Rehabilitation and cancer survivorship

Posted by St. Jude Communications Department | Jun 2, 2021

Kristin Lyons, director of Rehabilitation Services, and Jessica Sparrow, Lead Occupational Therapist, worked as part of a team of oncology rehabilitation providers from pediatric institutions across the country to co-author a recent Seminars in Oncology Nursing article, which provides a comprehensive overview of rehabilitation screening, assessment, and intervention for children with cancer.

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posterior fossa

Getting to the bottom of a medulloblastoma mystery

Posted by Erin Podolak | May 26, 2021

Posterior fossa syndrome develops in some children following surgery for the brain tumor medulloblastoma. St. Jude research offers fresh insight into the mysterious syndrome and advice on how to avoid it.

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water running down glass

NCCN publishes guidelines for standardized treatment of Wilms tumor

Posted by Katy Hobgood | May 19, 2021

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network recently published treatment guidelines for children diagnosed with nephroblastoma. Two St. Jude physicians collaborated on the project.

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Silhouette of woman

Melanoma clinic goes virtual for pandemic

Posted by Alberto Pappo, MD | May 3, 2021

Creating the St. Jude Melanoma Clinic not only provides enhanced multidisciplinary evaluation and care, but also opportunities for families to share their experience, attend educational sessions and enroll on a registry and tissue bank for research.

Learn more
Illustration depicting all the different things that occur during rehabilitation through an arch with symbols representing different rehabilitation ideas. A path goes between many things going on, such as jumping rope, reading and children playing.

Identifying risks and restrictions: Rehabilitation and cancer survivorship

Posted by St. Jude Communications Department | Jun 2, 2021

Kristin Lyons, director of Rehabilitation Services, and Jessica Sparrow, Lead Occupational Therapist, worked as part of a team of oncology rehabilitation providers from pediatric institutions across the country to co-author a recent Seminars in Oncology Nursing article, which provides a comprehensive overview of rehabilitation screening, assessment, and intervention for children with cancer.

Learn more
COVID-19 virus model, with spike proteins

Five things to know about COVID vaccines

Posted by Paul Thomas, PhD | Apr 5, 2021

No matter what kind of COVID vaccine someone receives, your immune system is primed to fight the virus. Here are 5 things you need to know.

Learn more
The path to cancer prevention Includes HPV vaccination

The path to cancer prevention includes HPV vaccination

Posted by Heather Brandt, PhD | Mar 4, 2021

There’s a global push to increase HPV vaccination rates, and if successful, there are these future benefits everyone can enjoy.

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Engaging partners to achieve HPV vaccination increases

Engaging partners to achieve HPV vaccination increases

Posted by Andrea Stubbs | Jan 29, 2021

St. Jude is partnering with the community to increase awareness and understanding of HPV vaccinations to prevent HPV-related cancers.

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Martine Roussel, PhD, stands for a portrait with her lab blurred out in the background.

Roussel’s early discovery shaped a career of cancer research

Posted by St. Jude Communications Department | Jun 7, 2021

Martine Roussel, PhD, faculty member and endowed chair in molecular oncogenesis, shares how early work on oncogenes led to her lab’s discovery of new oncogenes.

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St. Jude Children's Research Hospital exterior

We can – we will – accelerate progress globally

Posted by James R. Downing, MD | Apr 27, 2021

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital is launching the largest strategic investment in its nearly 60-year history, committing $11.5 billion during the next six years to accelerate research and treatment globally for children with catastrophic diseases.

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Adolescents and young adults approach a cancer diagnosis differently than young children or older adults. That means clinicians, partners and parents have to change the way they interact with them.

Three things for parents and clinicians to know about adolescents and young adults with cancer

Posted by Sarah Daniels | Apr 10, 2021

AYA diagnosed with cancer are just like any other teen or twenty-something. They have vocational aspirations, are working to develop a strong sense of self, have struggles with their body image and want to distinguish themselves from their caregivers. But these processes can become that much more difficult to navigate when an AYA must also learn to cope with a cancer diagnosis.

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Ten physicians share how they were inspired to pursue a medical career.

Celebrating Doctors’ Day: St. Jude physicians reflect on their career origins

Posted by Mike O’Kelly | Mar 30, 2021

National Doctors’ Day was first observed in 1933 in Winder, Georgia, when Eudora Almond, wife of Charles Almond, MD, decided to set aside a day to honor doctors and their contributions. Ten St. Jude physicians share their stories of how they were inspired to pursue a medical career.

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